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Jeff Weinstein
Jeff Weinstein
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Distracted Driving Kills Passenger In Oklahoma – Drive Safe XTHATXT

2 comments

Talking on a cell phone, texting on a cell phone and dropping your cell phone are all equally dangerous. A woman from Weatherford, Oklahoma, died as a result of a collision when a driver who dropped his cell phone and swerved into an oncoming van that she was a passenger in.

The collision occurred on Interstate 40 in Caddo County. Reports indicate that both vehicles were traveling eastbound when the driver of the car dropped his cell phone. While trying to retrieve the cellphone, the driver of the car swerved into the van's lane.

The driver of the van sustained minor injuries. His passenger died from her injuries sustained in the wreck.

The driver of the car was not injured. There was no indication whether he will face criminal charges.

This is so tragic. The driver of the car, 19 years of age, reaches for his cellphone, swerves and causes a collision that results in a death. What makes us so concerned about our cellphones that we risk injuring or killing someone just to retrieve the phone? My thoughts and prayers are with the family of the passenger that has died for absolutely no reason.

I find myself becoming more frustrated each day that I discuss this issue. I find people less and less concerned with the safety of not only strangers but themselves. Why would we risk everything including our freedom just to make a call, send or receive a text or pick up our dropped cell phone?

Drive Safe – XTHATXT

Say No to Distracted Driving

Jeff Weinstein

www.LonghornLawyer.com

2 Comments

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  1. Garrett says:
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    My thoughts and prayers go out to the driver, and to everyone affected by this horrible tragedy.

    A couple of things. One, if the driver wasn’t texting in the first place, this wouldn’t have happened. Second, he should have never reached for his phone and taken his eyes off of the road. We are all guilty of being distracted while driving, whether it be by cell phones, food, makeup, or any other number of things. Not one of those things is important enough to endanger other’s lives, or our own.

    Cellphone use, especially texting (and social media for that matter) is so ingrained in today’s youth from the time they are very young. I got my first cellphone shortly after I started driving, so that I could let my parents know where I was. All it could do was make calls and text. However, texting was so difficult on that phone, it made trying to text and drive unimaginable. Today though, everyone basically has a mini computer in their pocket. With all the information one could ever want a few taps away, people seem to forget that their own desire for information and connection is trivial to real, human connection; connection free from the aid of these devices.

    Parents should set an example while driving that defines texting and driving as dangerous. This shouldn’t just be something that is talked about and then forgotten. Unfortunately, it will take a tragedy that affects people personally before they realize and begin to care how dangerous that texting and driving really is.

  2. Nicki says:
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    I agree – Cell phone use is so prevalent today that young drivers don’t associate it with being a distraction. Parents need to set an example by abstaining from cell phone use while driving. We should also be constantly reminding our kids of the dangers of distracted driving.

    I think that most kids see a cell phone as a required possession now, and most kids view a car this was as well. We need to be reminding kids that cars are dangerous and cell phones are a privilege. This will only work if adults/parents start to remember the truth in this.

    How many times do we nag our kids about the dangers of drinking while driving? Why do we continue to be so flippant about cell phone use then??